The Other Side

Many photographers overlook the west side of Rocky Mountain National Park. The west side of Rocky requires a little more work then the east side of Rocky but it's well worth the effort. Here Cascade Falls and the North Inlet tumbles down the many rocks and boulders that make up this large waterfall on the west side of the park. Technical Details: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, 24-70mm F4 IS L
Many photographers overlook the west side of Rocky Mountain National Park. The west side of Rocky requires a little more work then the east side of Rocky but it’s well worth the effort. Here Cascade Falls and the North Inlet tumbles down the many rocks and boulders that make up this large waterfall on the west side of the park. Technical Details: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, 24-70mm F4 IS L
The west side of Rocky Mountain National Park is one of my favorite locations in all of Colorado for photography. While I spend eighty percent of my time photographing the east side of Rocky Mountain National Park, the logistics of photographing the west side are much more difficult and therefore I do not get to spend as much time as I would like on the west side of the park. Whether real or perceived, the west side of Rocky Mountain National Park has a distinctive and different feel and flavor to it then does the east side of the park.

The west side of Rocky feels more primal. It’s forests appearing darker and more expansive than other areas of the park. There’s more moisture on the west side of the park so water is more plentiful and cascades and falls seem to be around every bend in the trail. Much of the west side of Rocky is hidden from view. With a few exceptions driving Trail Ridge Road past Fairview curve and the Kawuneeche Valley gives you only brief glimpses of the jagged and towering peaks located on the west side of the park. In fact for most visitors, driving through the Kawuneeche Valley is more about spotting Moose or Elk in the meadows then it is about admiring the mountain scenery on the west side of the park.

Baker Mountain towers over the Kawuneeche Valley and the Colorado River only a few miles from it's starting point. Technical Details: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, 24-70mm F4 IS L
Baker Mountain towers over the Kawuneeche Valley and the Colorado River only a few miles from it’s starting point. Technical Details: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, 24-70mm F4 IS L

I make every attempt to spend time exploring the west side of the park when possible. Last week I had the opportunity to spend part of the week in Grand Lake so naturally I spent a few mornings on the west side of the park photographing some locations I’ve been eyeing for sometime.

Both Cascade Falls along the North Inlet trail as well as the Colorado River through the Kawuneeche Valley have been on my list for quite sometime. While I’ve attempted images at these locations before, I had yet to really come away with anything worthwhile. Luckily for me the conditions were very favorable this time for both dramatic lighting at sunrise as well as cloud cover and overcast conditions later on which where perfectly conducive for waterfall photography.

As the problem always is with these kind of opportunities, one only has so much time to explore and photograph all the locations on one’s list. So while I’m already plotting out my next outing over to the west side of Rocky, I’ll still be spending the majority of my time closer to home on the east side of the park.