A Tree Kind Of Week

It certainly seems to be the them lately and was again this week as well. Lots of colorful sunrises in Rocky Mountain National Park and Boulder this week. For the most part as has been the case the most beautiful color has been in the skies east of the mountains. That means working with the conditions instead of against them. While I was hoping for some nice color over the peaks of Rocky Mountain National Park this particular morning, the color was over Deer Mountain and to the east of Estes Park. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 70-200mm F2.8E FL ED VR lens

I’m sure you’ve heard the expression before that when life gives you lemons, make lemonade. While the saying has become cliche this week seemed to jive with the saying. This mindset very much applies to photography and I often preach the importance of heading out into the field with an open mind and the flexibility to switch up your game plan based on how the conditions are unfolding.

Living and photographing in Colorado means for most people the big draw is exploring of photographing our high beautiful high peaks and mountains. I would say for most photographers when heading out into the field we are hoping to somehow include and convey our majestic peaks while highlighted by a beautiful sunrise or sunset. Sometimes however, mother nature is just not all the interested in what your plans are you need to adjust accordingly.

I was really hoping for some colorful sunrises this week in Rocky Mountain National Park or down here around Boulder. I was hoping for dramatic lighting and clouds over the iconic peaks of RMNP or the Flatirons of Boulder. One of the two actually happened. We had really beautiful color in the skies at sunrise towards the end of the week but for the most part the clouds driven by high winds aloft stayed east of the continental divide.

Nature as she so often does dictated the terms and it was up to me to figure out how to make that work. So instead of photographing snow covered high peaks I instead had to change my thinking around and find some other subjects to photograph. In a nutshell this mean lots of backlit trees and mountains to incorporate the dramatic color that unfolded east of the divide the last few mornings of the week. All in all it was not what I was planning but as always I was thankful for the opportunity to be able to photograph. In the end lemonade can be pretty refreshing, especially after a long hike.

Saturday In The Park

I try to hammer this point home as often as I can when asked for tips about photographing in Rocky Mountain National Park. Many photographers will complain that photographing Rocky in the winter is difficult due to the winds and clouds. I always recommend that photographers keep an open mind and look past the iconic high peaks of Rocky and concentrate on some of the more sublte landscapes in the park. This lone tree in Moraine Park helped anchor a beautiful sunrise this past Saturday in RMNP on what would have been a difficult day to photograph the high peaks. Technical Settings: Nikon D810, Nikkor 24-70mm F2.8 ED AF
Saturday in the park. I’m channeling a line from the band Chicago here as it was the tune playing in the back of my head as I both attempted to stay warm as well as trip the shutter on my camera in between blasts of wind yesterday morning in Rocky Mountain National Park. Coincidently, the band Chicago recorded many of its songs just down the Peak to Peak highway from Rocky Mountain National Park at Caribou Ranch just north of Nederland.

Saturday’s sunrise was typical of what we often find in Rocky during the winter months. The high peaks of Rocky shrouded in clouds and high winds keeping things interesting below. It snowed the previous day but as is often the case in RMNP, the window is short before the winds and sun make quick work of the freshly fallen snow.

Pro tip for mornings like these which are common in Rocky is to turn your back on the mountains and point your camera in the opposite direction. I know it sounds like some heck of a tip I’m giving but hear me out. Mornings like these often have great cloud cover to the east. You may not be able to include Rocky Mountain National Park’s impressive and iconic high peaks in your image, but weather conditions would have prevented it anyway.

Find a subject to photograph and work in the great skies and more subtle landscapes that are found just east of the high peaks. It will save the angst of feeling like your journey out in to the windy wilds of Rocky Mountain National Park have been for naught and who knows, you might actually come away with some exceptional images. This options surely beats sitting in your vehicle sulking over the conditions and complaining once again RMNP left you empty handed.

Some Longs Views

A hike up the Twin Sisters in the Tahosa Valley just south of Estes Park reveals one of the best views of Longs Peak, Mount Meeker and The Diamond. I had some beautiful skies around Longs Peak as the sun rose and set the skies and peaks ablaze with color on Friday morning. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 70-200mm F2.8E FL ED VR lens

It was a mild week weather wise in Rocky Mountain National Park. There was no snow to speak of and the temperatures were very mild. Even the wind which usually accompanies warm weather during the winter months was mostly ‘average’ for Rocky. Much of the snow that has been hanging around the lower elevations of the park has melted and other than quite a few trees that have blown down or been uprooted from last week winds storms, the landscape remains dormant.

While the weather was temperate and above average there were a few mornings at the end of the week that hosted spectacular sunrises. Both Friday and Saturday mornings sunrise was spectacular over Rocky. On top of having two really colorful sunrises, the sun is now rising noticeably more towards the north as we move towards spring and summer. This is a welcome change as with the exception of the Mummy Range, most of Rocky Mountain National Park’s high peaks and ranges on the east side of the park are oriented in a northeasterly facing direction. In other words the lighting conditions for landscape photography are improving each passing day.

With the sunrise moving more northward each day, I decided to take advantage of the light and photograph Longs Peak on both mornings. While one can photograph Longs Peak anytime of year, the iconic face of Longs Peak known as The Diamond is oriented to the north and east making it optimal as we move towards the longer days of the year.

Friday morning I headed up the Twin Sisters to photograph Longs Peak. I was badly in need of putting some miles a trail and a hike up the Twin Sisters for sunrise was just what the doctor ordered. Saturday with the prospects for sunrise looking less like a slam dunk I hedged my bets at the Many Parks Curve overlook along Trail Ridge Road. Many Parks gives you a few options for sunrise but it also gives you a great vantage of Longs Peak with Beaver Mountain in the foreground. Both sunrises were beautiful and as always, Longs Peak looked majestic, imposing and iconic.

It’s easy to see why Longs Peak is not only the highest peak in Rocky Mountain National Park at 14,259 ft above sea level, but also why its a favorite subject of mine as well as the thousands of photographers the visit Rocky Mountain National Park each year.

Longs Peak pretty much looks awesome from anywhere on the Front Range, let alone Rocky Mountain National Park. This view of Longs Peak rising above Beaver Mountain is one of my favorites. The Many Parks overlook is easily accessible so it’s a favorite among photographers for good reason. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 70-200mm F2.8E FL ED VR lens

Weld County Wanderings

I love photographing trees. The high plains of Colorado lend themselves to this quite well. Big open skies above these three cottonwood trees make for a subtle but dramatic landscape which is typical of Weld County and Colorado east of the Rocky Mountains. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 70-200mm F2.8 ED FL AF

February on the Front Range of Colorado probably conjures up thoughts of cold and snowy landscapes. While we certainly get our fair share of snowy days in February, more often than not February is often a tame month when it comes to weather. Our blizzards and large snowstorms tend to occur early in the season in October or November or later in the season come March and April. February as was the case last week is often mild with seasonally warm weather and lots of sunshine. One caveat to mild February weather on the Front Range is our good friend the wind. These mild weather days or often powered by strong downsloping winds which warm the air as the descent the mountain range.

Last week was just that. Warm and mild in the Denver and Boulder area while at the same time being insanely windy. This made it nearly impossible for me to head up to Rocky Mountain National Park or even the foothills of Boulder for photography. Winds of over 80 mph were recorded in Estes Park and Boulder and Berthoud Pass above Winter Park even recorded gusts as high as 104 mph. If you have had the pleasure of trying to photograph landscapes in hurricane force winds you know that more often than not it can be a test in futility.

Windy days on the Front Range make photography tricky but the winds themselves often help to create beautiful lenticular clouds and some of Colorado’s best sunrises and sunsets. So while its hard to photograph in these conditions, its equally as difficult for a photographer like me to stay indoors and watch these spectacular sunrise and sunsets without attempting to photograph them.

Rocky Mountain National Park and the foothills were out of the question with the winds so I had to figure something else out. I figured it was as good a time as any to head out to some local spots here in Weld County east of the foothills and make an attempt to capture some of the beauty right here in my backyard.

This is about as far south and west as you can go in Weld County. It also happens to be about a two minute walk from my front door here in Erie making it an ideal location for sunrise. I drive by this location numerous times a day but never really gave myself a chance to photograph here until last week. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 24-70mm F2.8 ED AF

Weld County is not going to upset the apple cart when it comes to unseating the jaw dropping beauty of Rocky Mountain National Park or other mountainous areas in the foothills, the high plains of Colorado have a subtle beauty that is often ignored by photographers. While Weld County holds a certain charm, its a county that is continually changing. Whether it be from Oil and Gas interests or construction from the housing boom and growth Colorado is experiencing, locations in Weld County don’t remain unspoiled for long.

Truth be told, 99% of the time I’m guilty of ignoring some of this subtle beauty and will drive right past it heading to up to Rocky or to Boulder for sunrise or sunset. With the hurricane force winds abating somewhat as you head further east, I was able to check off a couple of nearby locations and capture some of that subtle beauty that is present in eastern Colorado. Will this be the start of a new project or portfolio?. It’s hard to say for sure but I believe strongly in photographing subjects in your own backyard. I can only be so many places at once so we will just have to see moving forward how much time I can spare to continue to photograph in my backyard. Even so, photographing locally is rewarding and something I’m going to try and make a better effort to do in the future, especially on those pesky windy days.

Check Your Blind Spot

This morning in Rocky did not break exactly the way I thought it wood. I arrived hoping to photograph freshly fallen snow on the landscape but instead found most of the roads in Rocky Mountain National Park were closed. I had to make due with limited access and ended up photographing these two trees along the side of the road. I've passed these two trees thousands of times before and never given them any thought. But conditions and access forced me to take a second  look and find beauty in limitation. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 70-200mm F4 AF ED VR
This morning in Rocky did not break exactly the way I thought it wood. I arrived hoping to photograph freshly fallen snow on the landscape but instead found most of the roads in Rocky Mountain National Park were closed. I had to make due with limited access and ended up photographing these two trees along the side of the road. I’ve passed these two trees thousands of times before and never given them any thought. But conditions and access forced me to take a second look and find beauty in limitation. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 70-200mm F4 AF ED VR

Photography for me is constantly evolving process. Technologies change, equipment change and subjects change. Personally, I find the longer I photograph the more refined my vision has become. After years of trial and error you begin to think you have a good idea of what works and what doesn’t work when it comes to creating images. Overall, I believe this progression and refinement is a positive development in one course as a photographer. Having a good idea of what kind of images you want to create and understanding what works and does not work for your particular style is evolutionary, but it comes with a catch. Whats the catch?, blind spots.

Discernment works well until it doesn’t. Being particular and deliberate in your compositions and locations are great as long as you make sure that you are not ignoring and closing your mind off to less seen compositions or subjects that may also help to improve your creative style. There is fine line between being discerning or ignoring potential.

I found myself guilty of this sin last week while out photographing Rocky. Snow had fallen the night before I headed up to the park hoping to capture snow capped peaks and snow covered pines. Like most photographers, I check the weather, study the predictive infra-red satellite maps all in an attempt to anticipate conditions in the field the next morning. I’ve written many a time how difficult photographing classic winter conditions in Rocky Mountain National Park can be, but this morning looked like one that might hold some potential.

Estes Park had received over a foot of snow in the past 24 hrs and Rocky Mountain National Park had even more snow, especially in the higher elevations. I was feeling pretty confident when I arrived at the Beaver Meadows Entrance station to Rocky in the predawn hours. As I headed up the road into the park I could see from the tracks in the snow that an NPS snowplow had already made its way up the road and into the park.

As some visitors to Rocky might be aware, they don’t typically plow the roads in Rocky Mountain National Park between 7:00 PM and 7:00 AM so the appearance of a plow this early appeared to be a positive development. While I have a 4 wheel drive vehicle and am confident driving in winter conditions and unplowed roads, the frequent winds in Rocky can turn that foot of snow on the road to a 4 ft drift all the while looking fairly benign through the headlights of a vehicle at 5:00 AM. I head up to Rocky in the winter to photograph, not spend hours trying to dig my vehicle out of a snow drift at 5:00 AM so I was happy to see a plow was already out working.

As I made my way past Bear Lake Road I could see the plow had turned left and headed up that way. The plow had closed Bear Lake Road so access to the entire portion of the park was not an option now. Not a big deal I thought to myself, I would just head up Trail Ridge Road and photograph from there. While I blasted through a couple of pretty good sized drifts cutting the first tracks on the road that morning, I arrived at Deer Ridge Jct. to find the Park Service has closed Trail Ridge Road up to Hidden Valley and Many Parks Curve. A little bit of panic started to set in. I now had only a very small portion of Rocky that I would be able to photograph and furthermore as so often is the case the high peaks were shrouded in clouds.

I was beginning to feel a little sorry for myself at this point. I had drive up to Rocky on snow covered mountain roads early in the morning anticipating beautiful winter landscapes only to find I may come away with very little to photograph. I parked in one of the roadside pull-offs and watched as some nice color began to form in the skies to the east of Rocky in anticipation for sunrise.

I might not have a lot of options and while conditions where not exactly how I had anticipated them being, I was now determined to find something to photograph. I thought to myself that ‘any photographer worth his salt could find something to photograph on this beautiful morning’. I grabbed my backpack, got out of my truck and started heading down the road towards a grouping of trees. I figured there has to be something to photograph here and at the minimum the skies are going to be spectacular.

Trudging around in the deep snow I kept looking for a composition of trees and sky that would work. I was getting frustrated when I started looking at two small pine trees located right off the road. I’ve driven by these two pines thousands of times and never given them a second look as they are right off the road and for the most part are unremarkable in appearance.

This morning I had few other options and I was determined to find something to photograph. I set up my tripod on the unplowed road and watched as the sky turned red and orange behind these two pines. A snow squall moved past and as I tripped the shutter on my camera I began to see some potential in the composition and landscape covered with fresh snow.

I had driven by these two trees so many times and never considered photographing them. In my mind the location was pedestrian and there wasn’t much reason to stop and survey the location in the past. Because of the conditions and lack of access to other locations in Rocky, I had to make due with what I was given and not what I though fit my style or preconceived notions for this morning. Being stuck in this location forced me to take inventory of the surroundings and more importantly check your blind spot.

First Of 2017

In what seemed like a long time coming I was finally able to capture my first images of 2017 from Rocky Mountain National Park. With other distractions out of the way, conditions unfolded nicely for a colorful sunrise after a snowy week in the park.   Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 24-70mm F2.8 AF ED
In what seemed like a long time coming I was finally able to capture my first images of 2017 from Rocky Mountain National Park. With other distractions out of the way, conditions unfolded nicely for a colorful sunrise after a snowy week in the park. Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 24-70mm F2.8 AF ED

With the 2016 in the rear view mirror and a new start to 2017 just underway, it was about time that I photographed Rocky Mountain National Park for the first time in the new year. With holiday parties and family festivities over, the time was right to get out and start creating some new images for 2017.

Holiday or not, the last month in Rocky Mountain National Park has been a challenge for photographers. Photographing Rocky Mountain National Park during the winter months is always a challenge, but this past December seemed to be particularly challenging. Clear mornings and lots of windy days had made it less than ideal. The month started off very dry and once the snow did start to fall, the storms quickly moved out leaving only high winds and snowless trees behind.

As is the case with both photographing Rocky and photography in general the key when one finds themselves in a rut or at the short end of the stick photographically speaking is to just keep heading out and photographing. Eventually the law of averages will prevail and perseverance will pay off.

Last week I headed up to the park on a day that looked like it might be ok for images at sunrise. The forecast showed there could be some clouds around but overall it also looked as if the chances to walk away with no new images would be just as likely. It had snowed a day before so I figured at least the high peaks of RMNP would look good with fresh snow even if most of the snow had melted and blown from the pine bows in the lower elevations.

As I waited for the sun to rise, conditions were looking less than promising for a dramatic sunrise. It appeared the skies over the continental divide were clear and only a small lenticular cloud had formed just east of the Estes Cone and Lily Mountain. I was going to capture my first images of 2017 regardless and as I setup my camera equipment as dawn was nearing I began to detect the slightest hint of a pink hue in the skies to the south of Rocky.

Thin high clouds were present in the skies and as the sun was rising a beautiful pink glow over the mountains of Rocky Mountain National Park was forming. With fresh snow on the peaks and a beautiful pink hue in the skies my first image of Rocky Mountain National Park for the new year shaped up nicely. All things considered I was quite pleased I decided to head on out to photograph this particular morning as opposed to watching this as a spectator from another location (namely my desk).

Welcome 2017!

The last sunrise of 2016 was a colorful one over the Mummy Range of Rocky Mountain National Park. While most of the skies over Rocky this windy morning were cloudless, a nice set of clouds clung to the top of Ypsilon Mountain adding some nice warmth to the cool morning. I'm looking forward to new pursuits and images in 2017 after a great 2016. Technical Details: Nikon D810,Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM C
The last sunrise of 2016 was a colorful one over the Mummy Range of Rocky Mountain National Park. While most of the skies over Rocky this windy morning were cloudless, a nice set of clouds clung to the top of Ypsilon Mountain adding some nice warmth to the cool morning. I’m looking forward to new pursuits and images in 2017 after a great 2016. Technical Details: Nikon D810,Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM C

Welcome to 2017!. 2016 seemed to just zoom right on past and its hard to believe another year is in the history books. Each year as we pass from one year to the next it’s fun to reflect on the previous year while looking forward to what the New Year will bring.

Almost like clockwork each year, the holidays, shorter days and colder weather slow some of my photography pursuits down and throw me off routine. People who know me well know that I’m a creature of habit and my routines keep me grounded, focused and motivated. I like socializing and sipping a little eggnog as much as the next guy but after a month of festivities, parties and interruptions to my normal daily routines, I’m ready to get back on the horse and start moving forward again.

Photographically speaking 2016 was a very productive year for me. I was able to spend a lot of time in the field photographing new locations in Rocky Mountain National Park and adding to portfolio of images. Furthermore, I had a great season guiding photography clients to all corners of Rocky Mountain National Park and I’m already looking forward to guiding clients in the field again in 2017.

I feeling refreshed and renewed. I have lots of plans for 2017 and cant wait to get out in the field crafting new images to fill my 2017 folders with. While it’s been very windy and mostly mild in Rocky Mountain National Park the last month, I’m keeping my fingers crossed that we will have favorable winter conditions over the next few months. Cheers and here’s and to wishing you a happy and successful 2017.

Choosing Sides

Trail Ridge Road officially closed on November 18th for the 2016 season. It was a great run that we had and it was a treat having Trail Ridge Road stay open so late into the season. It was this last snowstorm that descended over Rocky Mountain National Park last week that officially put an end to through traffic along RMNP's most iconic roadway. Here the sun rises behind Deer Mountain and the sky lights up over Horseshoe Park and Fall River after a day of snowfall in Rocky. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 14-24mm F2.8 AF ED
Trail Ridge Road officially closed on November 18th for the 2016 season. It was a great run that we had and it was a treat having Trail Ridge Road stay open so late into the season. It was this last snowstorm that descended over Rocky Mountain National Park last week that officially put an end to through traffic along RMNP’s most iconic roadway. Here the sun rises behind Deer Mountain and the sky lights up over Horseshoe Park and Fall River after a day of snowfall in Rocky. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 14-24mm F2.8 AF ED

What has been an amazing run of mild weather has finally come to an abrupt end. Note November 18th, 2016 as the official closing date to Trail Ridge Road for the season(Many Parks on the east side and the Colorado River TH on the west side). This is the latest Trail Ridge Road has stayed open since I’ve been photographing Rocky Mountain National Park starting in 1998. The latest Trail Ridge Road has remained open was December 2nd, 1933 with it’s average closing date being October 23rd.

With Trail Ridge Road remaining open so late into the season, we could access many area of Rocky that during a typical year require a much more intensive travel route or cross country skis and an extremely high tolerance for snow, wind and cold. Now when visiting or photographing Rocky Mountain National Park we have to pick sides so to speak. You can travel to Estes Park and the east side of Rocky, or head over to Grand Lake and the west side of Rocky but your going to have to wait until late May before traveling the 50 miles between the two towns again on Trail Ridge.

The vast majority of photographers are going to end up on the east side of Rocky because access is just that much easier for most of us who reside in or near the Denver metro area. A few of us will make trips over to the west side of Rocky but we wont have nearly the amount of easy access that we enjoy during the summer.

Which ever side you end up choosing enjoy the start of the winter season in Rocky. We need the moisture and snow not only to reduce fire danger but also to lay the groundwork for carpets of alpine sunflowers, flowing streams and waterfalls and green and lush hillsides come summer. There is still plenty to photograph on both the east and west sides of RMNP and as I always like to say the worse the weather is the more interesting it becomes for photographers. I’m already looking forward to that first ride over Trail Ridge Road in the spring of 2017.

Shouldering The Season

It's that time of year again in Rocky Mountain National  Park. Known as the 'shoulder season' the period between fall and winter is often ignored by photographers. With our mild autumn its still a great time to get out and photograph Rocky Mountain National Park. I was able to photograph this sunrise from the Gore Range overlook along Trail Ridge Road on October 27th of this year. Last year at this time, Trail Ridge Road was closed and was already covered with a good amount of snow. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 24-70mm F2.8 ED AF
It’s that time of year again in Rocky Mountain National Park. Known as the ‘shoulder season’ the period between fall and winter is often ignored by photographers. With our mild autumn its still a great time to get out and photograph Rocky Mountain National Park. I was able to photograph this sunrise from the Gore Range overlook along Trail Ridge Road on October 27th of this year. Last year at this time, Trail Ridge Road was closed and was already covered with a good amount of snow. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 24-70mm F2.8 ED AF

It’s a good time to check in and take inventory as we move closer to wrapping up 2016. For many photographers its a time to stash away the camera gear, revisit images and files made over the course of the summer and fall and start dreaming of next years journeys. As the autumn season draws to a close and summer begins to feel like a distant memory it’s easy to lose some motivation and move onto things other than landscape photography.

After some reflection on the speed at which summer and fall grace us with their beauty, I like to embrace this time of year and enjoy it for what it is. Some call it the ‘brown season’, others refer to it as ‘shoulder season’ while some just think of it as the end of the year.

I find that lowered expectations this time of year help me to relax in the field and enjoy the experiences for what they are. Unquestionably access to some of my favorite locations in Rocky Mountain National Park becomes more difficult this time of year, and weather conditions such as snow and wind can make photography challenging I find the quality of light on the landscape to be spectacular.

Furthermore I also believe that some our most colorful and dramatic sunrises and sunsets tend to occur this time of year. The landscape maybe turning brown but the skies will often be ablaze as the sun rises and sets. Because of these colorful sunrise and sunsets I like to refer to this time of year in Rocky as ‘Neon’ season.

This end of the autumn season here in Rocky Mountain National Park is shaping to be a bit of an anomaly as well. As I write this Trail Ridge Road is still open which is on average later than it would typically be. While Trail Ridge is often subject to nightly closings, we have had a very mild fall and only minimal amounts of snow on the mountains it has remained open to this point. While I expect that this pleasant and dry weather will abruptly end at some point in the near future, many locations in Rocky are still snow free, unfrozen and easily accessible.

In other words while it may be ‘shoulder season’ in Rocky Mountain National Park, I would recommend photographers ‘shoulder’ their camera bags and backpacks and avoid putting the finishing touches on their 2016 portfolios just yet.

Little Bit Of Fall Left

Even though the autumn season in Rocky Mountain National Park is quickly coming to a conclusion. There are still a few areas in the lower elevation of Rocky Mountain National Park where one can capture images of the fall season. These narrowleaf cottonwood trees in Moraine Park looked stunning as first light illuminated a snow covered Longs Peak yesterday morning. The aspen trees just in front of the golden cottonwoods are just starting to change from  green to yellow. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 24-70mm F2.8 ED AF lens
Even though the autumn season in Rocky Mountain National Park is quickly coming to a conclusion. There are still a few areas in the lower elevation of Rocky Mountain National Park where one can capture images of the fall season. These narrowleaf cottonwood trees in Moraine Park looked stunning as first light illuminated a snow covered Longs Peak yesterday morning. The aspen trees just in front of the golden cottonwoods are just starting to change from green to yellow. Technical Details: Nikon D810, Nikkor 24-70mm F2.8 ED AF lens
Autumn always seems to come to end in Rocky Mountain National Park to quickly. While its a wonderful time of year in the park, photographing the fall season is a challenge. Photographers are at the mercy of the weather and trying to be in the right place at the right time always mixes preparedness with a little bit of luck and maybe a dash of serendipity.

The coming crescendo of the autumn season in Rocky Mountain National Park will be met with satisfaction and enjoyment of the season, but also a little bit of sadness as we watch the landscape begin its transformation from the brilliant colors of autumn moving towards its long winter slumber. It’s a both a humbling and somewhat frightening experience to watch winters grip removed by the growth and warmth of spring and summer only to see it wiped away in such a short amount of time. Though I wont say I appreciate the coming of winter and the end of fall, it does allow one sometime to recharge and reflect on the beauty of the past season.

So while the fall season in Rocky Mountain National Park is quickly moving towards and end, there are still some opportunities to photograph the last hold outs of autumn. As of this writing there are still a few stands of aspens in the lower elevations of Rocky Mountain National Park that have some color. Moraine Park, a few areas around Upper and Lower Beaver Meadows as well as Horseshoe Park can still yield beautiful fall photographs. Higher elevations such as the Bierstadt Moraine and the Boulder Brook area are now far past peak.

Dont give up quite yet on fall in Rocky Mountain National Park. There are still a few areas that can yield some nice autumn images over the next week or so in the park. Enjoy the last vestiges of fall while they are still able to be enjoyed.